Sustonable receives a subsidy for a feasibility study about the shower walls of the Province of Noord-Holland

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Sustonable has been awarded a MIT feasibility study from the province of Noord-Holland.

The province offers this subsidy scheme in cooperation with the Dutch government. The aim of the scheme is to encourage sustainable innovations in SMEs in order to promote a sustainable, innovative and enterprising economy.

Our project fits within the innovation program of the top sector Chemistry, where one of the themes concerns improving waste management through the recycling of materials.

The feasibility project consists of a feasibility study into the application of our material as a shower wall. The activities consist of an inventory of available technology and potential partners and a market survey and competition analysis.

About Sustonable

Sustonable brings home the only truly sustainable composite stone materialmixing a unique combination of natural stone and recycled PET plastic. 

Sustonable is offering a more ecological surface that serves quality and customer affordability.

100% recycelbar, frei von gefährlichen Chemikalien, unbegrenzte Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten und High-Tech-Qualitäten make Sustonable surfaces the best choice for creating authentic eco-conscious spaces. 

Due to our rigorous manufacturing method, all of our slabs are carefully produced to maintain the same detail and quality. Hence, Sustonable is a very versatile product; it can be used for kitchen countertops, bathroom wall panels, vanity tops, backsplashes, worktops, tabletops, and bars. It perfectly fits any project which needs to be perdurable, resistant, elegant, and mindful about the environment.

Sustonable customers can feel proud of contributing to cleaning up our oceans of plastic waste, as we recycle 100 PET plastic bottles per m² of Sustonable surface created.

Are you ready to join our recycling marathon where every m² means 100 bottles less of plastics ending up in the environment?